Emotional Help for College Stress

With High School complete, the next life step for many graduates is college which includes new responsibilities, financial pressures and scholastic expectations. Many college students are not emotionally equipped for the challenges they will face.

Freshmen, in particular, must adjust to the interruption of old school relationships, inciting a sense of loss, grief and loneliness. New friendships take time to develop and it’s easy to make poor choices in the desire to connect socially. This can be complicated by any existing difficulties in connecting and bonding with others. Being in an ocean of new students all looking for connection doesn’t overcome those emotional intelligence deficits. [1]

On top of social pressures of finding a new tribe, students find that they must shift up to a new level of performance. They need to compete for grades with classmates who were also at the top in their own high school class. High costs of secondary education can bring financial pressures requiring an extra job, cutting back on housing and food expenses, resulting in a tougher life and sleep schedule, which also affect performance in class.

It’s a high stakes gamble that all the money and hard work will pay off in an increasingly competitive post-graduation job market — no pressure!

” A 2013 survey of over 123,000 students across 153 campuses confirmed that over half of students feel overwhelming anxiety, and about a third experience intense depression, sometime during the year.  Almost a third report that their stress has been high enough at some point to interfere with their academics—lowering their grades on exams or courses or projects—and 44% say that academic or career issues have been traumatic or difficult to handle. The majority of college students don’t get enough sleep, and half say that they’ve felt overwhelmed and exhausted, lonely or sad sometime during the year. “[1]

“According to mental health research conducted by the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI):

  • One in four students have a diagnosable illness
  • 40% do not seek help
  • 80% feel overwhelmed by their responsibilities
  • 50% have become so anxious that they struggled in school [2]

The five most prevalent mental health issues are: depression, anxiety, suicide, eating disorders, and addictions(drugs and alcohol)

How can we help them? How can we ease the pressure in our universities and colleges?

Arm Them with Emotional Resolution Skills!

Emotional Resolution, EmRes for short, is a simple technique that can be performed on the Self in the moment of the emotion (EmRes-Self) or in a session with a trained EmRes Professional (EmRes Session). EmRes uses the body’s own innate capacity to resolve negative and dysfunctional emotions.

Many studies have shown that times of very high stress and/or disruptive trauma, emotions are literally embedded into the body, where even vague similarities to the original event can trigger the trapped emotion to come rushing back, flooding the senses and disturbing any chance of a “normal” response or behavior. Results can range from anxiety and depression to rage and PTSD.

EmRes starts with the triggered situation and works back thru the limbic (emotional) center of the brain to access the body memories-the physical sensations that represent the emotion. Once accessed, the body does the work to eliminate the embedded emotion and it’s situational triggers. And voila! it’s gone forever!

EmRes Sessions are quick: 15-30 minutes. EmRes-Self is quicker, 8 sec to 30 secs is normal. Usually people use a combination of both in the early stages of the work.

Added Bonuses: no reliving or triggering; don’t need to know or understand the original trauma causing the problem; fully conscious, aware and in control at all times; don’t have to tell story or personal details.

Best thing: EmRes Sessions can be done in-person or over the phone. EmRes-Self can be taught in-person or over the phone.


If you or someone you love is in university or any other high-pressure situation where performance, social and financial pressures all collide with any emotional issues, you or they would do well to work with and learn Emotional Resolution.

Are you ready to let Emotional Resolution work for you?

Book an EmRes Session or EmRes-Self class


References
1. Why college freshmen need to take Emotions 101
2. The Top Mental Health Challenges Facing Students

Getting Along with Difficult People

You know who they are….those aggravating individuals. They range from rubbing you the wrong way to openly critical or aggressive toward you. They are in our families as the ornery sibling or the obnoxious in-law, sometimes it’s our friends that get an attitude, cross a line or demand too much from us, at work it’s the boss who is too demanding or a co-worker who shirks responsibility or points fingers at everyone but themselves, at church they are the shamers and judgers with no room to talk, at restaurants it’s the loud table in the middle of the room or the arrogant staff member, and it is those strangers in line with us at any store or event that takes us out of our comfort zone experience.

They can be anywhere. And they show up with a regularity that is freakishly amazing.

When I was working in the corporate world, it seems there was that one person at every job that got under my skin. They were different people, in different organizational positions from me with different agendas at each job. They showed up as a boss, a co-worker or a representative of another department that I had to work with. And they thought I did things wrong and I thought they were a$$holes.

I wish I had known about Emotional Resolution (EmRes) back then! Because I now understand that my fears and angst where projected onto my antagonist. In working with Emotional Resolution clients, I’ve found that the old axiom holds very true:

It takes two to tango.

If you need an adversary to hold up one side of an argument for you, someone will show up and carry on the other side of the dispute. As soon as you let go of the difficulty–the anchoring emotion, the other person will “lose interest”. This all happens at a subconscious level, of course, the undercurrent of conversation below speaking and listening.

You just have to break the cycle by letting go of your side.

I’ve seen this work time and again with spouses and pairings of all sorts. The client is “going crazy” when “they do that“, “they know I don’t like it, so why do they do it?” The client has a Emotional Resolution session to work on this specific antagonistic situation. And things change.

The client no longer has the embedded emotion that is “clinging to the story”. It’s almost like they forget about the recurring problem until I mention it at a later time. And the spouse “just doesn’t do it anymore,” is commonly in the result. At first I thought the anecdotal stories brought back to me by clients were small coincidences, entertaining to be sure. But they have happened with such regularity, that now I expect to hear them.

Letting go of emotions that power disagreements, that we brush off as “part of dealing with other personalities”, may seem trivial in the grand scheme of things. But imagine having a home, workplace, school, church, etc where you didn’t have that someone(s) that drives you crazy with their arrogance, controlling attitude or whatever. It would take so much stress out of our lives.

Emotional Resolution uses your situation, the scene of interaction with your antagonist, as its entry point. With this mental image, the emotional memories that are trapped in body are accessed and resolved. You don’t have to know where or how the emotions got trapped there. You don’t even have to name the emotion. You just have to know the situation that you don’t want in your life anymore, and the specific and precise protocol for Emotional Resolution does the rest. It is literally a reset button.

Are you ready to release your side of the story?

Book an Emotional Resolution Session today